Posts Tagged ‘cannes’

Share


[Reviewed by: Alex Miller]

Perhaps one of the best examples of how bad the Academy is at picking the best film of the year, Mulholland Dr. was not even nominated for Best Picture in 2001. Instead they chose Ron Howard’s competent but all too formulaic and forgettable A Beautiful Mind that year. Although Director David Lynch (The Elephant Man, Dune, Lost Highway) did win Best Director at Cannes, it took time for some people to give the film the acclaim it truly deserves. It’s understandable in that if there was ever a film that DEMANDED repeat viewings it is this one. It is the first and only movie I have ever watched and then immediately rewinded and watched again (mind you it’s a 2.5hr long movie). I was interested but confused the first time, understandably so I think. The second time I wanted to go erect a statue in my yard in dedication to this cinematic achievement. If you missed out on this film when it came out, STOP READING as it is impossible to discuss this movie at any level of detail without completely ruining it for you. Go watch it, then read this, then go watch it again. (more…)

Advertisements

Share


[Reviewed by: Danny Moltrasi]

“What is original?"

Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami’s first film made outside of his homeland, Certified Copy, gained some positive reviews from an otherwise rather uneventful 2010 Cannes Film Festival, where lead actress Juliette Binoche picked up Best Actress at the event for her performance. Mixed with French, Italian and English language throughout, and one in which director Kiraostami called his simplest film due to using professional actors and a relatively large budget for him to work with at €3.8mil, is a challenging attempt on originality, relationships and perception. (more…)

Share

Terrence Malick’s new film, The Tree of Life, has had rumours about its release date going around for months on end. It was due at Cannes…then at Venice or Toronto. None of these rumours came to be. More recently there was hope that it could be sneaked out in time for award season, however, this seems fairly unlikely now, even though distributer Fox Searchlight today announced that they have picked up the rights for the movie. Instead, it seems that The Tree of Life will not be out until late 2011, if, as expected, they are hoping it will bring in some Oscars when it is finally released.

This all comes just days after early viewings of the film compared it to Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, and its grand scale, with a rumoured three-hour cut doing the rounds, suggests that it is pretty much all complete anyway. This however, does mean that it could even get a showing at next year’s Cannes Film Festival, in the hope of a slow build up to award season, rather than the late 2011 release. This would seem to make sense, seeing how his previous work, The New World, was ignored by the Academy last time, and they may rather hope for a slow build up.

The Tree of Life, starring Brad Pitt, Sean Penn and Jessica Chastain, is a story described as a 1950s period piece, which also has been described as being completely fresh, as well as including scenes of prehistoric Earth. This although has also been claimed as being part of a companion piece filmed for a separate IMAX specific project. It seems now, that all that can be done is to wait and see.

Share

[Posted by: Justin Wagner]

Our Toronto International Film Festival Preview series features the best films that will be shown at the prestigious film event to be held Sept 9-19th. Our first edition highlighted the Japanese film Norwegian Wood. Today Justin Wagner takes a look at the highly anticipated new Woody Allen film, “You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger”.

Four decades strong and 40 films deep, Woody Allen has one of the most immense and impressive filmographies of any director.  To add more to his résumé, Allen has the most screenwriting nominations at the Academy Awards (all of which are “Best Original Screenplay”), his screenplay for Hannah and Her Sisters was the first ever screenplay to be considered for a Pulitzer Prize nomination, and he is one of the three directors to ever receive the Palme des Palmes.  In recent years,though, Woody Allen has been making some of his least interesting work.  Known for taking the best bits from classic films, condensing them, and making them just as good, if not better, than what he is taking from, Woody has for the last ten years or so just been making rehashes of his old New York inspired films.  On Allen’s 41st film, he retreats back to his recent muse, Europe, but with a script that seems to be “classic” Woody Allen. (more…)