Posts Tagged ‘films’

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[Posted by: Justin Wagner]

Woody Allen has always been a busy filmmaker, showing astonishing productivity and consistency throughout his career, and while in the 80’s he made 10 films, it was still one of his least fruitful decades. During the ending of the 70’s – beginning with Annie Hall – he ventured into a more sophisticated, dramatic comedy that would hint at the future filmmaker he would become. A year later he released Interiors which marked the first time he would direct a dramatic film. While these changes in style were new to Woody Allen, he would advance upon these changes very successfully in the 80’s with his increase of comedy/dramas and his new leading lady, Mia Farrow. Though the 80’s showed him making some of the best films of his career, it also was the start of him making bad films, or as bad as a Woody Allen picture can be. Let’s take a look at the best films Woody Allen has to offer from his career in the 80’s. (more…)

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[Posted by: Eric Raymer]

October is probably my favorite month because it gives me an excuse to watch a lot of horror films to get in the mood for Halloween. (Not that I need that much of an excuse.) It also means there’s a slew of new horror films ready to be released in theaters. If you’re wondering which will be worth checking out this month and which will just be more of the same cheap scares, keep reading for a breakdown of all the horror coming your way in October. (more…)

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Elephant / 2003 / “So foul and fair a day I have not seen.
Paranoid Park / 2007 / “I just feel like there’s something outside of normal life…

[Reviewed by: Eric Raymer]

It’s that time again – time for textbooks and school supplies, for bus rides and homework, for manslaughter and murder… Well, hopefully not those last two, although your odds aren’t great if you happen to be a character in a Gus Van Sant film. In Elephant and Paranoid Park, the kids are definitely not all right. Both films take place in high schools and focus on teenagers dealing with some problems that stretch a little further than your typical growing pains. (more…)

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[Reviewed by: Eric Raymer]

"10,000 degrees of Neo Full Metal Body declare war on the world!"

It’s been a while since we checked out Society in the first forgotten films article, but if you’re hungry for a little more out-of-print weirdness, read on. Tetsuo II may be just what you’re looking for.

Shinya Tsukamoto’s Tetsuo: The Iron Man burst onto the scene in 1989 and perfectly captured the feel of the industrial music scene in its clanging soundtrack and bizarre visuals. The film was shot in high-contrast black and white, and patched together a furious stream of imagery focusing on a man’s transformation into a bizarre metal creature. The convergence of man and machine is nothing new in the world of sci-fi, but rarely is it explored so viscerally. There’s an abundance of jerky stop-motion animation and handheld shaky-cam footage that adds to the nervous energy of the film, which is additionally boosted by the fact that it seems to have been edited by someone on crack. Once it gets going, Tetsuo doesn’t slow down for one second. (more…)

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[Reviewed by: Danny Moltrasi]

“You understand, if we don’t find a stiff out here, we leave a fresh one?”

Miller’s Crossing was the Coen Brothers third feature length film, dating from 1990. While still in a fairly early stage in their careers, Miller’s Crossing shows off the confident flair that had been acquired from the critical hits of Blood Simple and Raising Arizona. It tells the story of Tom Reagan (Gabriel Byrne) as he flicks between to Prohibition-era gangsters and the crooked bookie, Bernie Bernbaum, played by the fantastic John Turturro. Miller’s Crossing is told at its own pace, and never struggles to do anything else apart from that. It floats along, doing the normal Coen genre-hybridisation along the way, and nearly always hitting the mark smack on. If you like most Coen Brothers films, this will be right up your street. (more…)

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[Posted by: Alex Miller]

Think you’ve seen a lot of movies? Well Gwilym Hughes had seen more. How can I be so sure? The Guinness Book of World Records says so. In 2008, he officially became the world’s most frequent movie-watcher having seen over 28,075 of them. He then continued to average about 14 movies a week after that, documenting every one. What makes his passing yesterday even more tragic is that he put his love of film to good use. While he was alive he worked with over 10 charities putting his film collections on display for fundraisers. He left his collection to the National Library of Wales (where he lived). In addition, he ran a successful campaign to get the film Hedd Wyn nominated for an Academy Award in the category of Best Foreign Film, after becoming a fan of its cinematography. He will be missed. Click the jump to see his Top-5 Favorite Films and his thoughts on each. (more…)

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[Reviewed by: Eric Raymer]

"Only an idiot would do this job."

This past weekend The Expendables took number one at the box office, blowing both Michael Cera and Julia Roberts’ puny films away in a blast of pure testosterone. It seems like this was the summer action movie that audiences had been waiting for, especially after the somewhat lackluster A-Team reimagining and a slew of other half-hearted remakes and sequels. So is it worth it? Will it satisfy your craving for blood, sweat, and explosions? (more…)