Posts Tagged ‘Man’

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[Reviewed by: Eric Raymer]

"10,000 degrees of Neo Full Metal Body declare war on the world!"

It’s been a while since we checked out Society in the first forgotten films article, but if you’re hungry for a little more out-of-print weirdness, read on. Tetsuo II may be just what you’re looking for.

Shinya Tsukamoto’s Tetsuo: The Iron Man burst onto the scene in 1989 and perfectly captured the feel of the industrial music scene in its clanging soundtrack and bizarre visuals. The film was shot in high-contrast black and white, and patched together a furious stream of imagery focusing on a man’s transformation into a bizarre metal creature. The convergence of man and machine is nothing new in the world of sci-fi, but rarely is it explored so viscerally. There’s an abundance of jerky stop-motion animation and handheld shaky-cam footage that adds to the nervous energy of the film, which is additionally boosted by the fact that it seems to have been edited by someone on crack. Once it gets going, Tetsuo doesn’t slow down for one second. (more…)

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[Posted by: Martin Keller]

Profile: Sylvester Stallone has an impressive resume: he has acting credits in over fifty films and television shows, starring in and immortalizing two major movie franchises, Rocky and Rambo; he has over twenty writing credentials, having written the screenplay to the original Rocky (1976), he’s directed eight films and even has a few soundtrack credits from Rhinestone (1984) and Paradise Alley (1978) So, say what you will about the lack of substance in his work or strength of his acting, but Stallone is a man bent on success and has followed its trajectory all his career. When he first pitched the screenplay for Rocky to producers, they loved it and thought it a vehicle for another, already established, major star. But Stallone envisioned himself as the lead and didn’t want it any other way. As they say, the rest is history. The film was critically and commercially successful, winning the Best Picture Oscar, inspiring generations to come and has even spawned a video game. (more…)

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[Posted by: Alex Miller]

Think you’ve seen a lot of movies? Well Gwilym Hughes had seen more. How can I be so sure? The Guinness Book of World Records says so. In 2008, he officially became the world’s most frequent movie-watcher having seen over 28,075 of them. He then continued to average about 14 movies a week after that, documenting every one. What makes his passing yesterday even more tragic is that he put his love of film to good use. While he was alive he worked with over 10 charities putting his film collections on display for fundraisers. He left his collection to the National Library of Wales (where he lived). In addition, he ran a successful campaign to get the film Hedd Wyn nominated for an Academy Award in the category of Best Foreign Film, after becoming a fan of its cinematography. He will be missed. Click the jump to see his Top-5 Favorite Films and his thoughts on each. (more…)

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[Posted by: Martin Keller]

Profile:  As I sat down to write this article I realized I really like Bruce Willis.  I didn’t know why, but it deeply disturbed me.  Thus, deep soul searching was begun to uncover the core of this fondness for one of Hollywood’s most bankable stars.  The results of my search disturbed me more.  I perused his IMDB credits and mentally checked off what I’d seen.  I read a short bio on Wikipedia and watched some fan videos on YouTube.  I polled friends and realized that along with the rest of the country, and perhaps world, almost everyone I know likes Bruce Willis.  Even thinking back to the Willis movies I hated, Armageddon springs to mind immediately, I didn’t hate him, it was stupid Ben Affleck and Liv Tyler.  I realized that even after so much fluff I still liked him; he’s an actor that I am invariably attracted to, regardless of the quality of his work.  (more…)

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[Posted by: Mary Trishman]

Brand new contributor Mary Trishman takes a close look at the career evolution of Inception’s Leonardo DiCaprio.

I hated Leonardo DiCaprio when I was little. That was abnormal for a young girl at the time, which is precisely why I decided to hate him. I would draw deformities on his face in my sister’s Teen Beat magazines and make fun of Titanic, which was my sister’s favorite movie and therefore my least favorite. At the age of 12, I saw Titanic in the sticky-floored and now non-existent Hazleton Cinema with my mom and my aunt. To me, the movie was entirely too long and excessively depressing. I still maintain that perception. It made me cry, and my legs fell asleep about halfway through. And it seemed like every single female between the ages of seven and forty were in love with Leo DiCaprio. I, therefore, decided I hated him. (more…)

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[Posted by: Alex Miller]

It is a sad day for British Cinema and film-lovers everywhere as news arrives that because of budget constraints, the UK Film Council will be axed. Whether it is the right/wrong thing to do politically I’ll leave to you. However, in the last ten years the UK Film Council has helped fund over 900 films, including “The Wind that Shakes the Barley”, “Man on Wire”, and “In the Loop”. In addition, they’ve provided funding for 240 digital movie screens across the UK, as well as multiple projects aimed at teaching children the basics of filmmaking. Here is hoping that the UK Film Council gets reborn into a sort of non-profit organization, but who knows. We may never quite know the amount of loss in terms of film as a result of this. We will never know what films “would have been” that will now not get the funding to be made.

Source/Read more here: BBC News

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[Reviewed by: Alex Miller]

James Marsh, 2008 / "Life should be lived on the edge."

I had the chance to watch an amazing piece of film today. “Man on Wire” is, without a doubt, the most beautiful and inspiring documentary I have ever seen. In it Phillippe Petit, a Frenchman, does something truly American. He sets his sights on an impossible goal and doesn’t let anything stop him. It is amazing the amount of obstacles this man had to overcome to achieve a goal, which many may not even understand. Why would you want to go through all that trouble just to walk across a rope between two buildings? Why would you when, you may die trying to get across, if you do cross you’ll get arrested, and that’s all if you can even pull the whole thing off in the first place! That’s what I thought before I watched this film. But between those towers, doing “the impossible”, Phillippe taught us all a lesson. Sometimes, “why” just plain doesn’t matter. (more…)