Posts Tagged ‘the’

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[Posted by: Martin Keller]

I’ve been contributing to Dorkosphere since the summer, first doing a review and a news piece, but then wanting to do a column. Something I could come back to every week with a specific focus and something that would give me a deadline. This worked for over a month, and now I return without a new entry for the Action Stars column in over three weeks. I have offered assurances to the site editor that I would have something shortly, but my ability to write anything has been severely hindered. It’s not real life that has hindered me, you know, work and a girlfriend and obligations and things unforeseen. Nor have my hands been broken, nor my brain extracted. I have certainly been within reach of computers: I work at a library! No my inability to produce work, to be reliable, to put even the smallest effort into being creative has been usurped by one thing and one thing alone: The Wire. (more…)

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[Reviewed by: Alex Miller]

You don’t get to 500 million friends without making a few enemies, and you don’t make a movie this ambitious without making a few mistakes. But how can a movie about Facebook even be good? It can’t. This isn’t a movie about Facebook. It’s not even a movie about the guy who made Facebook. It’s about how in this day and age, friendship is so easily gained, and so easily deleted. However, the critics have gone out of control on this movie. I am here to tell you it isn’t as good as they say it is. It’s not our generation’s The Graduate or anything like The Godfather, as they would have you believe. It’s frankly not even close.  It is one of the better movies out this year, however, and that’s still pretty good. (more…)

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[Posted by: Eric Raymer]

One of the things that continually amazes me about zombie films is that whenever it seems they’ve been completely played out, an innovative director comes along and puts a new spin on the genre. Still, there’s lots of schlock out there, and most of the time I approach a new zombie film much like I would an actual zombie: cautiously. When news about a forthcoming Cuban zombie film called Juan de los Muertos (Juan of the Dead) broke in May, my skepticism-meter was reading pretty high. Fortunately, any doubts I had were erased when I saw the awesome teaser trailers for the film. I recently spoke with director Alejandro Brugués (who was kind enough to take a break from preparing to shoot the film to exchange some emails), and it’s clear that he’s a huge zombie fan who is really happy to be making this film. Keep reading for some exclusive information about the film as well as the teaser trailers. (more…)

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[Reviewed by: Danny Moltrasi]

“We gotta do somethin'. I can't tell you what it is, you can never ask me about it after we're done, and we're gonna hurt some people.”

Bank heist film, The Town, written, starring and directed byBen Affleck, is a very confidently made movie, with someone who is clearly better director than actor at its helm. Despite an overall well-paced film, and confidence enough to take the foot off the pedal at times to just tell the story, the action sequences do drag the film down. Watching cars fly about and bullets skim police officers just doesn’t cut it when compared to the rest of The Town, which in general, is a good film. (more…)

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[Posted by: Alex Miller]

According to Deadline, Ron Howard (The Da Vinci Code, Apollo 13, Willow) will be directing the first of 3 film adaptations of Stephen King‘s The Dark Tower series, as well as the first season for a television show. This had been rumoured for a while but now the deal is closed with Universal/NBC taking the project on. The series is 7 books strong so there is plenty of material to be used. I actually found this story while looking into reading it, as it has been compared to Clint Eastwood meets The Lord of the Rings. I don’t know about you but that sounds awesome.

What makes me less excited about this project is that Akiva Goldsman is set to write the first film and first TV season. His most recent work was producing Jonah Hex . A movie so bad I couldn’t even review it since my mom always taught me – if I couldn’t say anything nice then don’t say anything at all. Well there was definitely nothing nice to say at all and I actually think the Producer was one of the biggest culprits. But to be fair he’s writing this project, not producing. However, he’s ruined his fair share of book adaptations too. He turned Isaac Asimov’s sci-fi masterpiece I, Robot into a silly Will Smith vehicle. He then did almost the exact same thing with Richard Matheson’s I Am Legend. He’s worked with Ron Howard in the past, writing A Beautiful Mind and Cinderella Man a long with piss-poor adaptations of The Da Vinci Code and Angels & Demons. To me, his writing-style is boring and Ron Howard is the very definition of ‘hit or miss’. Let’s hope they decide now is the time to make their masterpiece and we all get something even close to the level of The Lord of the Rings to which this project obviously aspires to be.

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Reviewed by: Alex Miller

Kon Ichikawa, 1959 / "Kill yourself only if you have to."

Although this is technically the 2nd Criterion Collection film we have reviewed (after Videodrome), this is the first in our “Criterion Review” series. If you don’t know what the Criterion Collection is, it’s basically a company the strives to release important classic and contemporary films while giving them the highest possible treatment. Crtierion DVDs/Blurays are known for their high quality video transfers, outstanding cover art, and exclusive bonus features. Here is a complete List of the Collection. Now without further adue let’s take a look at today’s film “Fires on the Plain”!

Some people go to the movies for pure entertainment. Others go because they view film as a form of artwork that can be both deep and moving. I think film can be either one or both. This film, while entertaining to me, is dark and depressing. It is definitly art, however. This is a WWII movie from the Japanese perspective, released in 1959. It follows starving Japanese soldiers in the closing days of WWII when the only thing more scarce than food is hope. While it doesn’t try to make any political statements regarding that particular war, it is definitly an anti-war in general film. In the included interview, Director Kon Ichikawa states that he wanted to show the horrors of war at every possible opportunity. He himself was from Hiroshima, but he was away when the atomic bomb hit. He came back to see the utter destruction which he says, “no words can describe”, believing his family had been completely wiped out. Luckily he later found out that at least some of his family had managed to survive, but I think he channels this moment of total despair into the movie. (more…)