Posts Tagged ‘world’

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Terrence Malick’s new film, The Tree of Life, has had rumours about its release date going around for months on end. It was due at Cannes…then at Venice or Toronto. None of these rumours came to be. More recently there was hope that it could be sneaked out in time for award season, however, this seems fairly unlikely now, even though distributer Fox Searchlight today announced that they have picked up the rights for the movie. Instead, it seems that The Tree of Life will not be out until late 2011, if, as expected, they are hoping it will bring in some Oscars when it is finally released.

This all comes just days after early viewings of the film compared it to Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, and its grand scale, with a rumoured three-hour cut doing the rounds, suggests that it is pretty much all complete anyway. This however, does mean that it could even get a showing at next year’s Cannes Film Festival, in the hope of a slow build up to award season, rather than the late 2011 release. This would seem to make sense, seeing how his previous work, The New World, was ignored by the Academy last time, and they may rather hope for a slow build up.

The Tree of Life, starring Brad Pitt, Sean Penn and Jessica Chastain, is a story described as a 1950s period piece, which also has been described as being completely fresh, as well as including scenes of prehistoric Earth. This although has also been claimed as being part of a companion piece filmed for a separate IMAX specific project. It seems now, that all that can be done is to wait and see.

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[Posted by: Danny Moltrasi]

Michael Cera was the ‘in-thing’ not so long ago, but now it seems Michael Cera-bashing has long taken over that phase. The main criticism has always been that Cera plays the same, awkward teenage character, and that it has quickly become boring. I’ve even seen his casting in Scott Pilgrim vs. the World being cited as the reason behind the films limited box office success. But is that really worth the hate he has received? It seems to me that Cera has been on the hard end of many critics. (more…)

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[Posted by: Alex Miller]

Think you’ve seen a lot of movies? Well Gwilym Hughes had seen more. How can I be so sure? The Guinness Book of World Records says so. In 2008, he officially became the world’s most frequent movie-watcher having seen over 28,075 of them. He then continued to average about 14 movies a week after that, documenting every one. What makes his passing yesterday even more tragic is that he put his love of film to good use. While he was alive he worked with over 10 charities putting his film collections on display for fundraisers. He left his collection to the National Library of Wales (where he lived). In addition, he ran a successful campaign to get the film Hedd Wyn nominated for an Academy Award in the category of Best Foreign Film, after becoming a fan of its cinematography. He will be missed. Click the jump to see his Top-5 Favorite Films and his thoughts on each. (more…)

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[Reviewed by: Danny Moltrasi]

“Do you love him?”

Undertow, originally titled Contracorriente, won the World Cinematic Audience Award in the dramatic genre at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival. It is a beautifully told story, set on a coastal town in Peru, of two men who love each other. However, with one of them married, and his wife due to have a baby, their secret has to firmly remain under wraps. We take a sudden twist however, as the other man dies suddenly, and we are then faced with a ghost story as Miguel (Cristian Mercado) suffers with the aftermath. (more…)

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[Reviewed by: Sydney Freeman]

Introducing new contributor Sydney Freeman, with his review of the new Edgar Wright comedy that everyone is talking about!

Edgar Wright returns with a stylish movie adaption of the cult comic Scott Pilgrim series. The story revolves around our hero Scott Pilgrim (Micheal Cera) who meets the girl of his dreams Ramona (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) but in order to date her he has to defeat her seven evil exes. The result can only be summarized by one word, epic. Scott Pilgrim is the story for our generation. A story that could only make sense to the MTV powered, iPod connected Nintendo generation. (more…)

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Reviewed by: Alex Miller

Kon Ichikawa, 1959 / "Kill yourself only if you have to."

Although this is technically the 2nd Criterion Collection film we have reviewed (after Videodrome), this is the first in our “Criterion Review” series. If you don’t know what the Criterion Collection is, it’s basically a company the strives to release important classic and contemporary films while giving them the highest possible treatment. Crtierion DVDs/Blurays are known for their high quality video transfers, outstanding cover art, and exclusive bonus features. Here is a complete List of the Collection. Now without further adue let’s take a look at today’s film “Fires on the Plain”!

Some people go to the movies for pure entertainment. Others go because they view film as a form of artwork that can be both deep and moving. I think film can be either one or both. This film, while entertaining to me, is dark and depressing. It is definitly art, however. This is a WWII movie from the Japanese perspective, released in 1959. It follows starving Japanese soldiers in the closing days of WWII when the only thing more scarce than food is hope. While it doesn’t try to make any political statements regarding that particular war, it is definitly an anti-war in general film. In the included interview, Director Kon Ichikawa states that he wanted to show the horrors of war at every possible opportunity. He himself was from Hiroshima, but he was away when the atomic bomb hit. He came back to see the utter destruction which he says, “no words can describe”, believing his family had been completely wiped out. Luckily he later found out that at least some of his family had managed to survive, but I think he channels this moment of total despair into the movie. (more…)

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[Reviewed by: Alex Miller]

James Marsh, 2008 / "Life should be lived on the edge."

I had the chance to watch an amazing piece of film today. “Man on Wire” is, without a doubt, the most beautiful and inspiring documentary I have ever seen. In it Phillippe Petit, a Frenchman, does something truly American. He sets his sights on an impossible goal and doesn’t let anything stop him. It is amazing the amount of obstacles this man had to overcome to achieve a goal, which many may not even understand. Why would you want to go through all that trouble just to walk across a rope between two buildings? Why would you when, you may die trying to get across, if you do cross you’ll get arrested, and that’s all if you can even pull the whole thing off in the first place! That’s what I thought before I watched this film. But between those towers, doing “the impossible”, Phillippe taught us all a lesson. Sometimes, “why” just plain doesn’t matter. (more…)